The Day I Lost My Sam

It’s funny how in losing something, you find something else. Like when you’re looking for your lost earring under the dresser and you find that Lego piece your son needs or paperclips or cut toenails. Gross. Who finds cut toenails under their dresser? Definitely not me.

Celebrating the Found

Pacifier, binky, baby-plug. Whatever name you choose, there is no more desperate scene than a mother searching for this source of soothing as naptime approaches. A frazzled mom will turn the house upside down, frantically looking for this small, magical plug to stifle the shrill screams of her overly tired one-year-old.

An Open Letter to My Mental Illness

I suffer from a mental illness. At times, it can be crippling and debilitating. I just spent some time in the hospital dealing with my illness. One of the doctors knew I was a divinity student and Christian minister and asked me, “Have you lost your faith?”

Connections 04.24.2016: Rejoicing in the Found

The story of the prodigal son is one of the most confounding, ridiculous, and beautiful passages in the Bible. I can think of a few headlines that might apply: “Spoiled Rotten Kid Wastes Parents’ Money, Gets Rewarded.” “Father Accused of Enabling Ungrateful Son.”

Lost But Not Alone

My three-year-old is starting to understand and verbalize more about God than he ever has before, and it’s encouraging and overwhelming all at once. The other night after prayers were said and stories were told, there was a period of silence.

Flame: Children Teach the Story of the Lost Sheep

One of the new ideas we’ve tried out this year is to encourage the children to take a more active part in the teaching on a Sunday morning. This was our first attempt.

Crossroads: Waiting

When I was a kid, I loved playing baseball. We had several practices each week, but even when the team didn’t have a scheduled practice, I liked to go to the ball field by myself and practice hitting, catching, and running the bases.

Crossroads: The Shepherd

“Don’t talk to strangers.” It’s what my mother told me all the time growing up, and I’m sure it’s what you tell your own children. Strangers aren’t safe because you don’t know them.