The Miracle of Creating

Genesis 1:1-8

She began with a blank page, watching the cursor blink in time with her beating heart. Though eager to put her vision into words, she found doubt and anxiety hovering over her. Soon she heard the cursor say, “Stop. This is too messy. Let someone more qualified, more talented, more educated do what you could never possibly do.” And she slammed her laptop shut as her unwritten stories swirled back into the darkness.

They began with a dream, a nudge, a call. They saw a need, pictured a possibility. But they had no plan, so conflict and apprehension swept over the band of well-intentioned believers. They decided to keep doing what they had always done, since resorting to “we’ve always done it this way” had worked thus far. Good enough would be enough for them.

That anyone ever gets past the first step in creating something new is a bit of a miracle. That first, most difficult step of creation—sorting the dark from the light, the yes from the no, the that-will-never-work from the we-can’t-survive-without-trying-this—is where countless ideas, dreams, and callings die. If it were up to us to create alone, we’d be stuck on step one for eternity.

But, thanks be to God, we are made in the image of the Creator, who helps us see possibilities in the darkness. There is something to be made from our formless voids. Thankfully, the same sacred wind that swept over the messy first moments of creation hovers over our possibilities as well. What would happen to our creative beginnings if we let the spirit of yes replace the spirit of doubt and fear that likes to take up residence in our lives? Perhaps the first step in creating is remembering that God knows we are not perfect. God just wants us to begin.

Consider

What hinders you from taking the first creative step?

Pray

Creator God, we are ever grateful for your holy wind that still hovers over our possibilities. Give us the courage to allow your Spirit of yes to guide our new beginnings. Amen.

This post originally appeared in Volume 27.1 of Reflections.

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