David: After God’s Own Heart

n02002_david

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Age Group

Youth

Brief Description

Intersection includes complete resources for teaching both younger and older youth, including learner’s materials, teaching guides, and handouts. The teaching guide is options-based, so teachers can customize sessions to match their favorite approach.

“David: After God’s Own Heart”

The Books of Samuel and Kings give a realistic portrayal of “a man after God’s own heart” whose life was also marked by a scandalous affair and bitter family infighting. Although David was a national hero in his youth, couldn’t God have found a leader with stronger moral character or better ability to deal with family problems? Yet David accomplished great things, and therein lies the hope of youth. If God can look beyond David’s mistakes and use him, God can surely use young people today.

Session One: For all the sin committed in this account, David’s greatest error may well have been the attempted cover up of the original mistake. While some youth learn from the consequences of their actions, others just seem to repeat their mistakes. Simply because they know what is right does not necessarily mean that teenagers will make the right decision. Good decision-making is a process that can be mastered and this story is a process that can be mastered and this story is a good example of what not to do.

Session Two: Aware of wrongdoing, many youth may wonder what they can and should do. When Nathan confronted King David about his sin, he finally took responsibility for his actions. Youth need models like Nathan and like David. They need to know that confrontation is okay and that there is a right way to do it. Youth also need to know that the willingness to take responsibility for one’s wrongdoing is a sign of personal strength.

Session Three: Anger can be a healthy emotion when it serves as a siren warning us that something is wrong. Unchecked, it can become dangerous. Absalom was the angry young son of King David whose hostility had disastrous consequences for his family and the nation of Israel. Absalom serves as a warning–a red flag waving in Scripture calling us to deal constructively with our anger lest it fester into doom for us and for those around us.

Session Four: David’s failure to resolve the matter of his royal succession serves as a reminder of the value of good planning. Young people must learn to look towards the future and to make decisions in a timely fashion that will be beneficial later. The choices that teenagers make now, can affect them for years to come. Like King David, youth have the power to make their own decisions and must use that freedom wisely.

by Grace Burton Edwards

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The purchaser of this file has permission to print twenty copies of this Learners Study Guide. Neither the file nor the printed contents may be sold copied or transferred to another person or church. The purchaser may make a backup copy of the file.

The purchaser of this file has permission to print one copy of this Teaching Guide. Neither the file nor the printed contents may be sold, copied or transferred to another person or church. The purchaser may make a backup copy of the file.

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