Champions of Faith

n02010_champions

Please note: This product is a digital file. You will need to download the file to your computer and print it from your printer.

Age Group

Youth

Brief Description

Intersection includes complete resources for teaching both younger and older youth, including learner’s materials, teaching guides, and handouts. The teaching guide is options-based, so teachers can customize sessions to match their favorite approach.

“Champions of Faith”

Though greatly honored for centuries, the Christian heroes that youth will meet in this unit were real men and women struggling to follow God, make sense of their world, and touch others in significant ways. They were as normal for their day as the youth we know today. Our young people can become just as heroic as these champions of faith: Christians struggling to live in a real world.

Session One: These two young Italian Christians of the thirteenth century believed Scripture taught that everything was created for praising God. Though living in naturally beautiful surroundings, the people of that time were, like many of our time, preoccupied with amassing money, power, and prestige. Born to wealthy landowning families, these two champions of faith rejected their comfortable ways and embraced a lifestyle of love and respect for the natural world.

Session Two: Contemporary youth seem more vulnerable to a sense of hopelessness than previous generations. Over time, Jude has become one of the most beloved apostles in the Christian church and is now associated with those in hopeless situations. Job is a symbol of the disturbing truth that even the most godly people experience tragedy and struggle with anger toward God. These two champions of faith can be examples for young people of how to look to God for healing and hope, even when feeling hopeless.

Session Three: In addition to their active faith, the great champions of Christianity from Scripture and from church history spent time alone in listening prayer, or contemplation. Our Great Commission focus upon good deeds, while very much a positive, has left many youth with no models for this kind of prayer. Theresa of Avila’s story can teach youth how to strike a balance between the inner path of contemplative prayer and the outward journey of an active faith.

by Katie Cook

User License
The purchaser of this file has permission to print twenty copies of this Learners Study Guide. Neither the file nor the printed contents may be sold copied or transferred to another person or church. The purchaser may make a backup copy of the file.

The purchaser of this file has permission to print one copy of this Teaching Guide. Neither the file nor the printed contents may be sold, copied or transferred to another person or church. The purchaser may make a backup copy of the file.

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